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Infographics on the Urban History and Planning

Infographics on the Urban History and Planning

Timeline of Detroit by Lisa Naudin and Mariam Samur

Lisa Naudin and Mariam Samur compiled facts and statistics on the urban history of Detroit in a compelling graphical set.

Planning History of Detroit

Source: June Manning Thomas and Henco Bekkering. “Mapping Detroit. Land, Community, and Shaping a City.” Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2015. pp.27-51.

1-DETROIT FORTIFICATION & AGRICULTURAL FABRIC
By 1730, Detroit developed its agriculture along the riverfront. The “ribbon farm” lots are long and narrow so that each could have access to the water. Several of the “ribbon farm” owners gave their names to the actual streets. The topology of the “Fort Pontchartrain du Detroit, 1764” drew the principal avenues of the actual Detroit.

2-AUGUSTUS B. WOODWARD PLAN & “TEN THOUSAND ACRE GRID”
After the Great Fire of 1805, the governor decided to call Territorial Judge Augustus B. Woodward to develop a new urban fabric. In 1818, the plan was abandoned and only a fragment was used, that section is today’s Downtown Detroit.

3-DETROIT IN 1825

4-JEFFERSON GRID WITH THE PRINCIPAL AVENUES
The Jefferson Grid, developed by the U.S. Public Land Survey System, is a grid system used to implement propriety. It determines the orientation of the future of the urban fabric.

5-HIGH WAY AND RAIL SYSTEM
The railroad system is an antecedent of the grid that led to contemporary morphology of Detroit. It could be said that the rail system was incorporated into the grid.

6-URBAN RENEWAL PROJECTS OF 1963
Projects led by the Detroit City Plan Commission

Housing

Source: Detroit Public Schools. Dept. of Social Studies. “Detroit: A Manual for Citizens.” Detroit: Board of Education of the City of Detroit, Michigan University, 1958. William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan. Map Division.

Public Lands Plan: Vacant Lands

Within its 139 square mile territory, Detroit contains 24 square miles of vacant lands, not including the city’s park land nor accounting for the parcels that have been returned to productive uses. Those parcels were once occupied by housing units, businesses, or industry plans. Today, they are mostly small lots distributed within the neighborhoods; 72,173 of those vacant parcels are publicly-owned.

Source: “Public Lands Plan: Vacant Land” by Ted Schulzt, General & Strategic Planning, Planning and Development Department of the City of Detroit. Extended by: Detroit Future City. Publications Special Reports in site of Detroit Future City. United States Census Bureau.

Ethnicity

Detroitography. Featuring And Creating Great Maps Of Detroit.

Urban Timeline of Detroit

Download the full timeline

Source: Detroit Public Schools. Dept. of Social Studies. “Detroit: A Manual for Citizens.“ Detroit: Board of Education of the City of Detroit, Michigan University, 1958. /  Jaime Castilla Santos, extended by the research of Beatriz Fernández Águeda and Jerry Herron. Castilla Santos, Jaime. “Searching for Sugar Land.” Koozarch, April 2017. / Fernández Águeda, Beatriz. “Futuros urbanos: la reversibilidad del proceso de deterioro”. Madrid: Departamento de Urbanística y Ordenación del Territorio, ETSA Madrid, 2013. / Jerry Herron, “Chronology: Detroit since 1700”, In: “Working paper: Complete Works 1 – Detroit”. / Detroit Future City. Publications Special Reports in site of Detroit Future City. / United States Census Bureau.

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